Jessica Toyota

Oct 20

Radiotopia: A Storytelling Revolution -

If you love Radio Stories Podcasts this is a project for you to know and support. If you don’t love Radio Stories Podcasts, you are missing a lot. 

This is what makes me not to notice that it is not raining anymore and I am the only one walking on the street with an open umbrella.

Aug 28

[video]

Aug 05

felt pen

felt pen

Jul 23

[video]

Jul 15

Jun 23

creativemornings:

"I like to learn by doing and failing and learning from the mistakes I make."
— David McCandless.
Watch the talk.

creativemornings:

"I like to learn by doing and failing and learning from the mistakes I make."

— David McCandless.

Watch the talk.

Jun 16

[video]

Jun 12

During my first semester studying Social Sciences I  tried to think of a theorist in relation to others. Since I didn’t know anything about theory, the only way I could do it was in terms of time and not ideas. So I created an Excel spreadsheet with bars indicated when and for how long they lived. The ones on this image end up being the one I studied the most (not much really).

During my first semester studying Social Sciences I  tried to think of a theorist in relation to others. Since I didn’t know anything about theory, the only way I could do it was in terms of time and not ideas. So I created an Excel spreadsheet with bars indicated when and for how long they lived. The ones on this image end up being the one I studied the most (not much really).

Mar 15

[video]

Jan 14

explore-blog:

How wine colonized the world – 6,000 years in 40 seconds. Also available as an interactive timeline. Pair with the indispensable scratch-and-sniff guide to becoming a wine expert. 

explore-blog:

How wine colonized the world – 6,000 years in 40 seconds. Also available as an interactive timeline. Pair with the indispensable scratch-and-sniff guide to becoming a wine expert

(Source: , via explore-blog)

Oct 27

Legendary Anthropologist Margaret Mead’s Love Letters to Her Soulmate, Ruth Benedict -

Oct 26

urbangeographies:


The beneficial “agglomeration effects” of public transit for economic development
As a long-time fan and rider of public transit – trains, subways, buses – I have always enjoyed the chance to take a break from driving, relax, and people watch. After moving to New York from California, I was amazed at how many things one could pack into a short period of time in Manhattan via the efficient public transit system! The environmental benefits in terms of reduced energy consumption and the increased efficiencies of urban density have been widely recognized in recent years. Now comes a report that public transit systems may be well worth the investment in terms of enhanced labor markets and economic development as well. As reported by Eric Jeffe in a recent edition of The Atlantic Cities, “…hidden economic value of transit could be worth anywhere from $1.5 million to $1.8 billion a year, depending on the size of the city. And the bigger the city, they find, the bigger the agglomeration benefit of expanding transit.” This conclusion stems from data analysis in a new paper by Daniel Chatman and Robert Noland, set for publication in Urban Studies, which makes a strong case that transit produces urban agglomeration. Chapman says: "It’s all about how people interact with each other. This is what could be happening by virtue of this densification near transit stops, which could happen from investments that draw people to use transit." Read the full report here.

urbangeographies:

The beneficial “agglomeration effects” of public transit for economic development

As a long-time fan and rider of public transit – trains, subways, buses – I have always enjoyed the chance to take a break from driving, relax, and people watch. After moving to New York from California, I was amazed at how many things one could pack into a short period of time in Manhattan via the efficient public transit system! The environmental benefits in terms of reduced energy consumption and the increased efficiencies of urban density have been widely recognized in recent years. Now comes a report that public transit systems may be well worth the investment in terms of enhanced labor markets and economic development as well. As reported by Eric Jeffe in a recent edition of The Atlantic Cities, “…hidden economic value of transit could be worth anywhere from $1.5 million to $1.8 billion a year, depending on the size of the city. And the bigger the city, they find, the bigger the agglomeration benefit of expanding transit.” This conclusion stems from data analysis in a new paper by Daniel Chatman and Robert Noland, set for publication in Urban Studies, which makes a strong case that transit produces urban agglomeration. Chapman says: "It’s all about how people interact with each other. This is what could be happening by virtue of this densification near transit stops, which could happen from investments that draw people to use transit." Read the full report here.

reformisttae:

The population of the world, and the size of America that would be taken up if everyone was kept in the density of certain cities.
I hadn’t realised just how dense Paris must me!

reformisttae:

The population of the world, and the size of America that would be taken up if everyone was kept in the density of certain cities.

I hadn’t realised just how dense Paris must me!

Oct 08

explore-blog:

Truth. Richard Feynman, Jonah Lehrer, and Neil deGrasse Tyson would all agree.
(↬ It’s Okay to be Smart)

explore-blog:

Truth. Richard Feynman, Jonah Lehrer, and Neil deGrasse Tyson would all agree.

( It’s Okay to be Smart)

(Source: explore-blog)

Oct 04

[video]